Little by Little Raquel Wallace is Changing the Lives of Aspiring Dancers

by Bridget Conrad | 11/1/2017 2:34 PM


Photo Credit: Laura Luc

The performing arts teach children creativity, confidence, and focus. They also give kids the opportunity to forget about the stress that comes with being a child and to just get lost in a moment. Sadly though, not all children have the opportunity, or the means, to have performing arts in their lives. Stage and screen star Raquel Wallace saw this first-hand when was 10-years-old and traveled to Colombia on a mission trip. Ever since, she’s made it her mission to help aspiring young performers who don’t have access to performing arts or can’t afford to pay for classes.


During Wallace’s trip to Colombia with her mom, they visited a halfway house to dance and sing with a lot of talented girls. By the end of the trip, Wallace formed a strong bond with a girl named Alison, but when she went back to the same halfway house the following Christmas, she learned that Alison had become a victim of human trafficking. This news hit Wallace hard and from that moment on, she proclaimed that she would touch the lives of children through her passion for singing, acting, and dancing, hence Little by Little was born.

Little by Little is a performing arts volunteer program comprised of young entertainers from Broadway, TV, and dance. Members of the program receive invitations to enroll in upcoming activities and anyone who is available at that time will volunteer. The program’s initiatives include working with the performing arts community to provide scholarships for performing arts programs, participating in performances and workshops, and collaborating to find locations for dancewear donations.

The program continuously collects new and used dance wear to be distributed to underserved, aspiring young dancers around the world. Recently, Misty Copeland became affiliated with Little by Little and traveled to Cuba to give donated clothes to hopeful performers. In addition, Little by Little also sent clothes to Haiti, Colombia, and Panama, as well as to dance studios in Houston and Louisiana after those areas were hit with natural disasters.

Perhaps the most dynamic part of Little by Little is the events put on by the members of the program. Workshops and classes have been held all over the world in places like Colombia, Iceland, and Guatemala. Locally, Wallace visits a school for kids with special needs every week to sing, play instruments, dance, and read with the students.


Photo Credit: Broadway World

Past events put on by Little by Little include “Go Back to Dance,” which was dancewear drive in Houston after Hurricane Harvey, and Bailando y Viajando, a dance workshop in Colombia. De Novo, was a one-night event where performers came together for a show and the proceeds helped well-known choreographers TOKYO and Alisha after they lost everything in a fire. Finally, members joined forces for “Dance for Haiti” and “Dancers for the Flood Victims in Louisiana.”

Advocates for the performing arts are much needed in today’s world. Every day we hear that funding for the arts is being cut from schools, but if a 10-year-old child can start a volunteer program and raise awareness, then we should all be able to do our part. So, next time your child grows out of their dancewear, instead of letting it collect dust in your house, send it to Little by Little and do your part to make performing arts available to our youth.


Keep Reading

More From Bridget Conrad

Vince Horiuchi Brings the Art of Breaking to Students in Underserved LA Communities Ballethnic Dance Company Celebrates 30 Years of Promoting Social Change Through Dance Learn More About One of Nina Dobrev's Favorite Dance Classes- Les Mills BODYJAM The Embodiment Project is Bridging the Gap Between Street and Concert Dance Dancer Resource Center’s Day of Dancer Health Scheduled for Nov. 9 AXIS Dance Company Teams Up with Arthur Pita for 'In-ter-twine: Alice in Californiland' So You Think You Can Dance All-Star Paul Karmiryan Sizzles in Ed Sheeran's New Video for 'South of the Border' How Misty Copeland Inspired Alison Stroming to Start Her Own Mentorship Program